NYC Shuttles Homeless Men from Subway to Packed Shelter

NYC Shuttles Homeless Men from Subway to Packed Shelter

 

Citicare vans line up to drop off homeless men at the 30th Street Men’s Shelter during subway shutdown May 6 2020. - NYC Shuttles Homeless Men from Subway to Packed Shelter

Citicare vans line up to drop off homeless men at the 30th Street Men’s Shelter during subway shutdown, May 6, 2020. Photo: Human NYC

 


 

The convoy arrived in the chilly Manhattan darkness around 1:30 a.m.: vehicles pulling up one after the other outside 30th Street Men’s Shelter, the city’s biggest refuge for homeless New Yorkers.

The passengers who emerged at this temporary bus stop all shared the same story: They’d just been expelled from the subway during the system’s new daily 1 a.m. to 5 a.m. COVID-19 scrub-down.

Advocates question why, of all the places the city could bring these men, the Department of Homeless Services chose one of the most crowded shelters — one where social distancing has proved a major challenge, spurring efforts to reduce the headcount there.

“I can’t think of a worse place than 30th Street,” said Josh Dean, director of the nonprofit homeless support group Human NYC. “How dangerous is it to take these people off the subway and put them in this one place?”

As THE CITY has documented, the 850-bed shelter in Kips Bay has struggled to cope with the many challenges posed by the coronavirus pandemic.

A cafeteria in the 30th Street Mens Shelter was packed with people during the coronavirus outbreak. PhotoObtained by THE CITY - NYC Shuttles Homeless Men from Subway to Packed Shelter

A cafeteria in the 30th Street Men’s Shelter was packed with people during the coronavirus outbreak. Photo: Obtained by THE CITY

 

Located on First Avenue next door to Bellevue Hospital, the shelter serves as the main intake center for single men in a system that houses 56,000 to 58,000 individuals each night.

Mayor Bill de Blasio has touted an “amazing” number of homeless who’ve agreed to spend the night in city-run shelters during the indefinite overnight subway shutdown.

But advocates for the homeless contend the mayor’s declarations do not make clear that the homeless on trains and in stations are simply being relocated to potentially dangerous conditions within shelters.

 

‘Lives are at Stake’

 

Giselle Routhier, policy director for the Coalition for the Homeless, said her group has pressed City Hall to instead move these unsheltered New Yorkers into the “isolation hotels” the de Blasio administration has booked to temporarily house COVID-positive people with nowhere else to go.

“It is flat out dangerous and disingenuous of the mayor to transport unhoused people to congregate shelters where COVID-19 is actively spreading,” Routhier said. “People’s lives are at stake and he refuses to provide available empty hotel rooms to people experiencing homelessness.”

Workers at the 30th Street shelter have for weeks struggled to enforce social distancing.

DHS staff and peace officers there say they’ve had to make do without enough proper protective gear, and several have tested positive for the virus, according to workers who spoke to THE CITY on the condition of anonymity. In March, a supervisor at the shelter who was believed to be presumed positive passed away.

The pressure at 30th Street has increased since the New York City Transit Authority shut down subways overnight for cleaning and disinfecting starting May 6.

An estimated 2,000 men and women who had sought refuge on trains and in stations were left to fend for themselves amid unseasonably cold temperatures, with many hunkering down on streets and in city buses.

Each night, outreach workers hired by DHS approach these individuals at the end of subway lines and offer to transport them to shelters or hospitals. Most have declined, but a total of 479 agreed to go to shelters on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday, according to DHS.

An outreach worker involved in the subway effort told THE CITY that on Tuesday, of the 130 “engagements” performed that night by the non-profit that employed the worker, 64 wound up carted off to the Bellevue shelter.

 

 

Continue reading this article from the original source on THE CITY

 

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